What you said, what we did

Listening to people may not always result in the change some people would like. The information, views and experiences shared with OCCG can result in different outcomes. For example:

  • People may tell OCCG about how something should be changed to improve the experience for patients.  This then influences change.
  • People may tell OCCG how something should be changed to improve the experience for patients but for other reasons (such as clinical safety, financial or workforce constraints) this was not possible. 
  • People may tell OCCG something that confirms a plan or approach is right and should be continued with confidence.
  • People may tell OCCG something is not working or that it needs investigating. If so, OCCG reviews priorities to include this new area of work.

This page of the website includes examples of how OCCG has worked with patients, the public and others to illustrate these different types of outcomes over the past year. For previous years please see here.

Horton Maternity

Description:

As part of the work to look at maternity services at the Horton General Hospital, we engaged women cross Oxfordshire on their experience of using maternity services during the time of the temporary closure of obstetric services. This included a survey, focus groups and interviews with women and their partners.

What you said:

The full report and analysis of the engagement is published and available here.

Women reported their experience of ante-natal care, labour and childbirth and pot-natal care. The focus of the project was to help make decisions about the Horton maternity services but a number of issues were highlighted relating to wider maternity services including difficulties in accessing the JR site whilst in labour, the importance of having as much available locally at the Horton General Hospital as possible so that even if the birth takes place in Oxford the ante-natal and post-nata care should be in Banbury and access to information about choices available to women.

What we did:

OCCG have agreed to work with Oxford University Hospitals on an implementation plan to improve mothers’ and partners’ experience and enhance access to maternity services (particularly for the population in the Horton catchment area) by introducing:
 
a. A dedicated hotline for women in labour and their families to navigate the site and use priority parking in an emergency. This is in addition to current work to address travel and parking issues at the John Radcliffe Hospital site. 

b. An expansion of services available at the Horton MLU or virtually to enable women to receive most of their maternity care closer to home; and increased facilities for birth partners to stay overnight at the John Radcliffe Hospital.

c. Better information for women on the choice of options available, including joint working and strengthening links with South Warwickshire Foundation Trust to ensure Warwick Hospital is an attractive option

 

Engaging the Muslim community

Description:

The CCG made contact with local Imams and carried out visits to mosques in the city to speak to the Muslim community about the importance of getting vaccinated against flu and how to stay healthy over the winter period.

What you said:

There were approximately 1,800 people who attended the events we held at the mosques. The groups that we spoke to were generally aware of the flu vaccination but there seemed to be a misunderstanding about the benefits of getting vaccinated as well as concern about the nasal spray for children containing Porcine Gelatine.

There was also a keen desire from this community to learn more about how they can generally stay healthy all year around and find out more about symptoms of various long term conditions, especially type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer and dementia and if there is anything that they can do to prevent their onset.

What we did:

The CCG arranged to meet with a group of South East Asian women to discuss general practice in further detail, what they would like from the CCG and their concerns about visiting a GP. They explained that most of the ladies (aged 40s and 50s) were suffering from aches and pains and that when they visited a GP there were factors that they were limited by. They also said that it is important to consider that most people can’t read so we need to find other ways to raise awareness of the benefits of changing lifestyle and diet, and also how to do this.

The CCG is also in the process of working with lead clinicians and Public Health to return to the mosques to discuss challenges and barriers to healthcare with a view to reducing health inequalities. It is currently planning to form a network to inform NHS, local authority and others of areas for improvement and provide education and encourage the dissemination of information.

Improving health outcomes for homeless people in Oxfordshire

Description:

Luther Street Medical Centre is an NHS GP surgery in Oxford which provides specialist services to people who are homeless or vulnerably housed. It also provides a range of other services including mental health services, advice on benefits and drugs and alcohol services. The primary care service delivered within the centre is commissioned byOCCG and provided by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust. The contract was up for renewal. In order to inform the procurement processOCCG sought to gather feedback and comments from patients and service users at Luther Street Medical Centre to plan and shape the services for the future as well as those voluntary and charitable organisation that work with people who are homeless. 

What you said:

There was high satisfaction with the service among patients who stated that the service  they received at Luther Street Medical practice was very good; doctors were responsive and 'knew their stuff' and the location was convenient.  

For more information on what was said please visit here.

What we did:

OCCG underwent a formal procurement process for the provision of primary care medical services at Luther Street Medical Practice and following an evaluation of the bids, the contract for the provision of Primary Medical Services for Homeless Patients was awarded to Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, the incumbent provider. The new contract will start on 1 April 2020 and will be awarded for 5 years. 

Health and care needs in OX12

Description:

OCCG along with health and care partners inOxfordshire have undertaken a project to look at the health and care needs of theWantage and Grove area (covered by the OX12 postcode) to help determine what services are needed locally. As part of the project a Stakeholder Reference Group was set up to support this piece of work. Its purpose was to bring together patients, carers and the public from the local community with partners of the Health andWellbeing Board to ensure public views and experiences are taken into account in the project. 

What you said:

The Project team met with the Stakeholder Reference Group on many occasion however feedback from the group to the local Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee was that they did not feel listened to. 

What we did:

In September 2019, the OX12 Project held a 'listening event' with members of the OX12 Stakeholder Reference Group to give members of the Stakeholder Reference Group an opportunity to put forward their views to a panel of senior NHS decision makers and to explore and discuss these with them. Items included reviewing the application of the health and care needs framework in OX12; Wantage Community Hospital, Primary Care and issues around access to services covering increased demand, population growth and transport. For more information and action arising from the listening event please go here.

Developing information to support Boat Dwellers to access health services in Oxford City

Description:

A new leaflet has been developed for people who live on boards in Oxford City to help them access health care services.

What you said:

Feedback from Boat Dwellers in Oxford City suggested there were issues in accessing GP services locally due to having no fixed address. 

What we did:

OCCG and Oxford City Council worked together to develop a new leaflet, that was distributed to the boating community in Oxford. The leaflet includes information on GP services and how to access them as well as what you need to register at a GP practice; NHS111, A&E and local pharmacy. 

Documents:

The Accessing healthcare when you live on a boat leaflet is available here.

Musculoskeletal Services

Description:

The CCG carried out a survey to seek patient experience of services with new provider.

What you said:

Whilst patient satisfaction levels were high at 70% rating their experience as average or above average with 30% classing it as excellent; a key theme identified was that administration was lacking and some respondents found it difficult making appointments. 

What we did:

The CCG and Healthshare were aware of issues with the administrative system in order to responsd to meet the enquiry demand and better meet patient booking needs. The following measures have been taken:

- HealthShare have commenced booking a first patient appointment and sending out an appointment letter to the patients directly following processing the referral (triage)

-HealthShare have automated certain administrative functions to increase staff allocation to answer and process call

- Additional staff have been employed to handle calls

- Plans are underway to make a Choose and Book process, available to all HealthShare patients, enabling patients to book online and match a preferred location, with a preferred date.

Documents:

A copy of the survey report is available here.

Older People's Strategy

Description:

Together OCCG and Oxfordshire County Council, on behalf of the Oxfordshire System, worked together to develop an oldler people's strategy. The work included joint public engagement throughout the summer of 2018, including a survey and outreach community work to meet and discuss with older people what matters most to them as they age. Following this the draft strategy was consulted upon. 

What you said:

Four key areas emerged from what you told us through the engagement:

  • Loneliness and isolation 
  • Keeping active and healthy 
  • Access to services 
  • Planning and lifestyle

What we did:

The new vision and priorities were co-produced with a wide range of people whose work and lives the strategy affects. This included; members of the public, service users, patients and their families, clinicians, local councillors, commissioning and service managers and third sector organisations,

This strategy aims to create a new image of what it is to become older, to create a new focus on prevention that helps people live well for longer. It will help to ensure that people can remain independent for as long as possible by having access to the right support at the right time.

Documents:

The engagement and consultation reports are available here.

Primary Care Decision Tool

Description:

The CCG embarked on developing a decision making tool for when an existing practice contract ends or when significant population growth is planned. This included discussions with a local patient participation group and two workshops to develop a process for Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire to guide the CCGs’ decision-making.  The aim was to co-produce a decision-tree using various scenarios and possible options to guide the work.  Participants included members from Oxfordshire HOSC, representative for Witney Town Council, patient representatives, patient member of Oxfordshire Primary Care Commissioning Committee, Local Medical Committee, NHS England and Healthwatch.

What you said:

At the first workshop the various options available to the CCG were considered and scenarios were then discussed in small table groups with the intention of identifying the questions needing to be asked and the possible ordering to create a decision tree.

The output of these discussions was taken away and used to create a draft decision tree. A further workshop was organised to review this draft and to test the scenarios. Several changes were made to refine the decision tree. The complexity of the task was acknowledged and it was agreed that the decision tree would be re-drawn to incorporate the necessary changes.

What we did:

A decision tree produced through this work and used to inform future primary care provision in the county.

Documents:

The decision tree is available here.